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...And Minding Less.And.Less, If I Am -Colder- [entries|friends|calendar]
When there's nothing left to lose...

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Wait... what?!?! [Jan 21st, 2010 @ 1:38pm]
Haha, sentence of the day...

Du arbeitest zuviel.
Je werkt toeveel.
Trabajas demasiado.
Trabalhas demais.
Lavori troppo.
Tu travailles trop.
Vi laboras tro multe.


REALLY? NO SHIT.
3 | Take a wing for your journey

C'est pas juste. [Jan 8th, 2010 @ 10:14am]
[ mood | crushed ]

Happy died.

:'(

1 | Take a wing for your journey

My sentence of the day! Yay! [Jan 7th, 2010 @ 11:42am]
French:

Le monde hait l'optimisme.

Spanish:

El mundo odia el optimismo.

Italian:

Il mondo odia l'ottimismo.

Portuguese:

O mundo odeia o otimismo.

German:

Die Leute hassen den Optimismus.

Dutch:

De mensen haten het optimisme.

Esperanto:

La homoj malamas la optimismon.

...

We're just specks.
Take a wing for your journey

I'm not just a number... But I wish I were. [Jan 4th, 2010 @ 3:43pm]
In the art of customer service, people often speak about the importance of being treated as an individual human being, instead of a number. Although treating someone as a number may be cold, referencing or indexing someone by a number, imho, has numerous [BAM it's a double entendre] benefits.

I've done some light Googling, so far to no avail. Can anyone point me in the direction of materials bringing to light the benefits of being a number?

(As always... No, the materials don't have to be in English.)

Thanks flist!
4 | Take a wing for your journey

Bloody nose! [Dec 21st, 2009 @ 4:34pm]
muckefuck's last post made me recognize a phrase I don't really know in many foreign languages:

I have a bloody nose. It's easy to find each language's derivation of the medicinal term epistaxis, coming from Greek. However, outside Spanish and French, I was hard pressed to see what phrases and terminology are used to say, "I have a bloody nose".

So, if you see a translation beginning with ??, it means I couldn't find how to translate the sentence, and you should help me :)

Spanish:

Tengo sangrado de nariz.
[A mí] me sangra la nariz.

French:

J'ai le nez qui saigne.
Je fais les épistaxis.

Italian:

?? Nosebleed: l'epistassi, l'emorragia nasale and la rinorragia mean "nosebleed".

Portuguese:

?? Nosebleed: A sangria nasal, Espistaxe, Epistaxis and hemorragia nasal

German:

?? Nosebleed: das Nasenbluten

Dutch:

?? Nosebleed: Bloedneus. Not sure if it's a de or a het noun.

Esperanto:

I think one would say, "Mi havas [nazosangadon / nazosangfluon / nazosangumon]."

~~~~~

In English, I can only think of the phrase "Nosebleed seats". Not sure if there are any other bloody nose idioms in English... Not sure of any in other languages.

That's all for now!
4 | Take a wing for your journey

Some English, this time. [Dec 18th, 2009 @ 1:10pm]
Dutch sentenceS of the day:

Vandaag kregen we een erg verlegen nieuw meisje in de klas.

The Esperanto translation is easy for this one:

Hodiaŭ ni akiris tre timidan novan knabinon en la klaso.

- Maybe akiri isn't the right verb, but with every new language I study, more and more do I hate the verb "to get"... It's like trying to translate "awkward".

- It's also possible that klaso should take the accusative -n, but I'm pretty sure it shouldn't.

And now to German! It seems like the hardest part about trying to build my German vocab is the number of possible words I always find. For the Dutch verlegen, I found:

Verlegen, Schüchtern, Verschämt, Befangen, Scheu, and Zaghaft. With really no way to pick out the difference between any of them. So I tried:

Heute bekamen wir ein sehr verlegenes neues Mädchen in der Klasse.

Although the Dutch sentence used the simple past kregen, my instinct tells me that German would use haben...bekommen.

---
EDIT: I had a minor epiphany... If the Dutch sentence used the verb krijgen, maybe the German sentence would be better with kriegen, making the verb either kriegten oder haben...gekriegt. Ja? Nein? Vielleicht?
---

Lastly, two-way preposition in? We got a new girl in the class? Since no one is really going into anything, I assumed it was dative and went with der Klasse.

I need want another Darvocet. took 3 more, and hate how normal everything still feels. Ende.
5 | Take a wing for your journey

achhhhhh [Dec 15th, 2009 @ 4:03pm]
Mijn Nederlandse word van vandaag:

Grauw...

Het weer was guur en grauw vandaag.

Is het niet ZO WAAR?! Ik ben zo ziek (Kan men dit zeggen?) met de weer dit jaar :( Dit winter, wil ik nooit werken en ben ik ALTIJD zo koud.

Ik wil nur slapen, tot de zon terug uit komt...
4 | Take a wing for your journey

The customer is always... [Dec 10th, 2009 @ 11:03am]
Lately, a certain thought has occurred to me frighteningly often:

Man's most detrimental realization was that he is entitled to anything.

.

So it's a trend now?

We're not just telling people to turn their cell phones off on planes and in hospitals, where something can actually go wrong?

We're putting up "Please turn your cell phone off" signs in our waiting rooms, because personnel find it unpleasant to help a customer who is on the phone?

Have we forgotten who pays our paychecks? This is completely counter-intuitive with the trend of business. The customer is more right, more always than they've ever been, and yes, I do believe that if that customer wants to yap on the phone and make it difficult for you to converse with them... Well, it's their right as your customer.

I think there's a lot to be said for style, class, and having the common decency to turn your phone off when you're interacting with another human being, but don't put up signs demanding decency. Customer service has always had to deal with indecent customers. You're being paid to do so.

Cell phones and cigarettes. You can buy 'em. We tax the crap out of 'em. Good luck finding a place where you're actually allowed to use 'em.
5 | Take a wing for your journey

Once again... [Nov 23rd, 2009 @ 1:21pm]
I think my last post in the esperanto community was one of the first times I've gone to a language community, made mistakes, and not had the crap beaten out of me verbally by the other community members :) Hope they're ready for today, as I'm sure to make even more mistakes in my Esperanto venture for today...

Sometime soon, I'll try to update this from home, so as to be able to attach a voice recording :D

More attempts to create grammatically sound Esperanto sentences...Collapse )

I'm SO TIRED today...
Mi estas TRE LACA hodiaŭ...
10 | Take a wing for your journey

9 languages to come in this post... [Nov 19th, 2009 @ 12:54pm]
This is phenomenal. I started nurturing an interest in Esperanto nearly 6 years ago as a freshman in college. It was short-lived, and I spent years hardly THINKING about the language. Recently, however, I've found that Esperanto just may be a way for me to keep up on learning multiple languages.

You all know my affinity for Transparent's Word of the Day website. That's where all of my Dutch sentences have come from. Today, I ran away with that idea, and it became quite the lingsplosion. So, without further ado...

Jen la miaj frazoj de hodiaŭ, esperantigitaj de latina, itala, nederlanda, franca, portugala, germana kaj hispana!Collapse )

I've also found some reliable online Esperanto resources...

-www.freelang.net/ - English - Esperanto Dictionary
-www.swahili.it/ - HUUUUGE Italian - Esperanto dictionary
-commons.wikimedia.org/ - 1930's French - Esperanto dictionary
-uebersetzung.babylon.com/ - Online Translator German - Esperanto
-aulex.org/ - Spanish - Esperanto dictionary

:)
5 | Take a wing for your journey

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